timthumbWhen questioned after making a suicide attempt, most teens say that they did it because they were trying to escape from a situation that seemed impossible to deal with or to get relief from really bad thoughts or feelings.

Some people who end their lives or attempt suicide might be trying to escape feelings of rejection, hurt, or loss. Others might feel angry, ashamed, or guilty about something. Some people may be worried about disappointing friends or family members. And some may feel unwanted, unloved, victimized, or like they’re a burden to others.

We all feel overwhelmed by difficult emotions or situations sometimes. But most people get through it or can put their problems in perspective and find a way to carry on with determination and hope. So why does one person try suicide when another person in the same tough situation does not? What makes some people more resilient (better able to deal with life’s setbacks and difficulties) than others? What makes a person unable to see another way out of a bad situation besides ending his or her life?teen-depression

The answer to those questions lies in the fact that most people who commit suicide have depression.

Contrary to popular belief, suicide is Not Always Planned.

Sometimes a depressed person plans a suicide in advance. Many times, though, suicide attempts happen impulsively, in a moment of feeling desperately upset. A situation like a breakup, a big fight with a parent, an unintended pregnancy, being outed by someone else, or being victimized in any way can cause someone to feel desperately upset. Often, a situation like this, on top of an existing depression, acts like the final straw.

Some people who attempt suicide mean to die and some aren’t completely sure they want to die. For some, a suicide attempt is a way to express deep emotional pain. They can’t say how they feel, so, for them, attempting suicide feels like the only way to get their message across. Sadly, many people who really didn’t mean to kill themselves end up dead or critically ill.

counselling-hotlineWhen you feel as though suicide is the only way out, please take a second and give us at Lifeline South Africa a call. We have qualified counsellors and caring people just waiting to help you out of that dark place that you may be finding yourself in.

In addition to the telephone counselling offered by a number of centres around the country, the national counselling line receives an average of 200 calls a day, allowing callers to discuss a range of challenges from trauma and suicide to relationship issues.

This line operates 24 hours / 7 days per week – feel free to call us for more information and counselling on 0861 322 322